Apr 032017
 

Tips on getting the best sale price for your motor

A car is one of the biggest financial investments that many of us will make and it can be an important part of everyday travel. However, there may come a time where you and your beloved motor must part ways. You may have a desire to upgrade to a newer and/or a more economical model. You may have to change your vehicle type to be more accommodating for business or family life. Your income from selling your current motor should help contribute to your next purchase, so it pays to have made the effort to keep your car in good condition. Not only will this help you get the best possible price when you’re ready to sell but it will also be safe and reliable for its new owner as well.

Warranty Direct has complied some straight forward tips that can help you with selling your motor.

First impressions count

When selling your car, make sure that it is clean and tidy inside and out. A buyer will want to visualise themselves in your vehicle, and that will be a lot harder to do if the vehicle doesn’t look appealing.

A grubby, unwashed vehicle exterior may also give the impression your car hasn’t been looked after properly to a buyer. As well as giving the car a good wash, it’s worth paying attention to the condition of the car’s body. Any scratches that can be buffed out, small chips filled in and dents removed will make your vehicle instantly more desirable and add value.

On the inside, the interior should be as equally appealing. A floor littered with old receipts, sweet wrappers, CDs and empty water bottles for example will not help you sell. Another cost-effective tip is to change any worn interiors, such as old floor mats – you will be surprised at how small tweaks can smarten up your car’s overall appearance.

Provide a valid MOT, service & warranty

A valid MOT is essential for any car on the road. If it is close to running out, it should be renewed before selling. No one wants to purchase a vehicle and then immediately have to shell out for unknown faults, due to poor maintenance. A recent MOT will give the buyer more confidence in the vehicle, as opposed to a car which may not have been professionally checked for a while.

Arranging a complete service history will also help give any potential buyers a full informed background into how your vehicle has been maintained throughout your ownership. It’s important to make sure you have the vehicle’s V5 or Logbook documentation as it will also show the necessary information. You’ll also need it if you do complete a sale as the V5 / Logbook will need updating to reflect the new owner’s details.

It is also useful to check the status of your warranty, whether it is a manufacture’s or an extended one, as selling with one that is still valid could allow you to get more money for your vehicle. For a car’s warranty to be binding it will need to have been serviced in the last 12 months and any issues fixed prior to sale.

An added benefit of most extended warranties is that they are often transferable (for a small fee) if you sell before your policy expires. This can add value and make your car more attractive to buyers, but make sure you check with your provider if there are any reasons why transferring may not be possible.

Ensure the price is right

Once you have checked on the warranty status and MOT, you will need to decide how much you want to list your car for. Online research through car buying websites such as Auto Trader can provide a good indication of price by allowing you to see how much similar cars have been selling for.

It might also be worth checking your car’s depreciation from the original purchase value. This can help give you an idea of a realistic expectation of value from any potential buyers.

List your vehicle correctly

When listing your vehicle, it is essential to describe it as accurately as possible. The car make, model and year the car was first registered is vital. It also helps to inform any potential buyers looking at your listing about any faults that may currently exist with the vehicle – even if they’re small and not necessarily required following the last service or MOT.

The more informative and accurate your listing is, the better the chance of being able to attract the right buyer. A lack of information or exaggeration of facts can hinder any potential sales. The buyer knows exactly what they are getting for their cash and letting them know clearly with your listing is the best way to do that.

You must detail the year the car was registered and ensure all its documents are up-to-date and passed onto the new owner.

Completing the sale

If you’ve managed to sell your car, it is important and a legal requirement that you let the DVLA know you no longer own the vehicle and it has a new owner. Updating and sending the vehicle’s V5 documentation will allow the DVLA to update its records accordingly. You must also make sure you cancel your current vehicle tax. The new owner of the car will have to tax the vehicle themselves.

Informing the DVLA and making the required changes to documentation and tax can protect you from any parking tickets, speeding fines, tax or SORN fines that may happen with the new owner. So, make sure the DVLA are informed of the sale as soon as possible otherwise you may be handed any future offences of the new owner.

If applicable, your warranty company will need to know about the sale as well. Whilst most providers are more than happy to swap a warranty, the new owner’s details will still need to be checked and logged. Failure to do so will make the warranty void.

Dec 262015
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want some expert advice on the latest scams, plus paperwork and checklists to give you the edge when buying a used car then HPI has the answer, or rather its free guide is here to help.

HPI provider of the HPI Check® is helping used car buyers get it right, when it comes to parting with their hard earned money, with the launch of its digital HPI Used Car Buyer’s Guide. In all the excitement of buying a car, it’s easy to overlook the essentials or even fall prey to common scams. HPI’s comprehensive guide aims to encourage consumers to do their homework to minimise the risks, as well as highlighting the latest scams fraud sellers are carrying out.  It also acts as an important reminder to buyers to conduct a vehicle history check via www.hpicheck.com.

Buying a used car is exciting, but it can also be daunting, which is why HPI has created the Used Car Buyer’s Guide,” explains Neil Hodson, Managing Director for HPI. “Throughout the online pages of this guide, consumers will get advice on how to decide what the best buy is for them, what to look out for when viewing and test driving a potential purchase and how to get the best deal.”

The HPI Used Car Buyer’s Guide gives advice on what to do if people are buying privately or from a dealer, the importance of conducting professional inspections, as well as practical top tips on conducting a thorough test drive. Crucially, HPI’s expert advice includes a section on the most common used car buying scams – clocking, cloning, ringing and cut ‘n’ shuts – giving advice on how to spot one and explaining what the very real risks are.

The guide doesn’t stop at the point when someone decides they want to purchase a vehicle. HPI offers tips on negotiating a good price with the seller, as well as looking into getting the best warranty and insurance deals to make the buyer’s purchase decision financially sound.     Fundamentally, the Guide gives buyers advice on what to do if the purchase goes wrong; 1 in 3 cars checked with HPI have something to hide.

Neil Hodson concludes, “The launch of our new Used Car Buyer’s Guide is part of HPI’s ongoing commitment to helping consumers understand the risks, giving them the tools they need to shop and buy with confidence. Of course, a vehicle check, such as the www.hpicheck.com remains one of the best ways to ensure a vehicle isn’t a write-off, recorded with the police as stolen, clocked or on outstanding finance. Together with this new guide, HPI is helping used car buyers avoid purchasing a lemon, ensuring they drive off into the sunset with the car of their dreams.”

The HPI Check includes a mileage check against the National Mileage Register as standard, now with over 200 million mileage readings. HPI also confirms whether a vehicle is currently recorded as stolen with the police, has outstanding finance against it or has been written off, making it the best way for consumers to protect themselves from fraudsters looking to make a fast profit. In addition, the HPI Check offers a £30,000 Guarantee* in the event of the information it provides being inaccurate, offering added financial peace of mind to used car buyers.

* – subject to terms and conditions. See HPI Check website for more details.

Sep 252015
 

Skoda RoomsterVauxhall Meriva

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skoda Roomster vs Vauxhall Meriva

Small, practical and slightly funky cars are all the rage and perfect for equally funky families.

Why Buy?

We buy cars on looks and when we do that we end up with a Roomster. Cheaper to buy and run than the Yeti, with a less odd name but bags of space. The Meriva is good to drive and has groovy doors as the rear ones hinge the other way. Lots of space inside of course.

Which models?

The Skoda Roomster dates from 2005. There is a Scout model which made it look a lot more like an off roader, so its all for show and no 4 x 4 go. 2010 is when the Meriva became really interesting with those hand clap style doors. Also more refined and better to drive too.

Are they reliable?

On the whole both vehicles are pretty reliable and the Skoda seems to have faults spread around the fewest components. Both the Vauxhall and the Skoda suffer from the modern malady which is electrical issues. Both though rate above average according to Warranty Direct.

How much do they cost?

The Roomster can now be bought below £2000 and at the other end of the scale a two year old example is just over £12,000. You might get a 2010 Meriva with high mileage for £3300 rising to £13,500.

Sum Up: Both are great small family cars. The Roomster does not look it, but is the more conventional. Most of all both are interesting.

Skoda Roomster

Average Repair Cost: £333.75

Electrical: 45.45*

Axle/Suspension: 18.18%*

Gearbox: 13.64*

Warranty Direct Rating: Above Average to Good

* failure rate

Vauxhall Meriva

Average Repair Cost: £287.23

Electrical: 32.95%*

Steering System: 16.76%*

Transmission: 13.29*

Warranty Direct Rating: Above Average