Oct 132016
 

The latest results from Warranty Direct reveal the Mitsubishi Lancer is the most reliable family car according to the latest data from their Reliability Index website.

The Reliability Index analyses all the vehicle data on live Warranty Direct and collates it into creating a reliability rating. The lower the rating, the better the reliability. As well as finding out the overall reliability of a car, the index offers information on which car parts fail most often  such as air conditioning, axle & suspension, braking, cooling, electrical components, engines and fuel.

Family cars are usually chosen for being specifically good at daily domestic work, which means considering a certain set of parameters rather than just an outright type of model. Many couples are more likely to choose a vehicle based on its ability to meet family needs. Practicality, running costs and price all score high on the hit list, though some want style and something fun to drive, too.

Top ten most reliable family cars

Position Model Sector
1 Mitsubishi Lancer Small Family
2 Honda Insight Small Family
3 Mercedes-Benz CLC Small Family
4 Honda Accord (08-) Family Car
5 Honda Civic (00-06) Small Family
6 Toyota Prius (03-09) Family Car
7 Hyundai i30 Small Family
8 Nissan Almera Small Family
9 Honda Civic (06-) Small Family
10 Toyota Prius (09-) Family Car

The Mitsubishi Lancer, is the most reliable family car with the time spent off the road for repairs typically less than an hour and the average repair cost only £69. The Honda Insight came in at second place, but due to a high number of reported issues occurring with its axle suspension, the costs of repairs are over double that of Mitsubishi’s averaging at around £137. This lowered its position in the rankings.

Both cars received good family car reviews with the Mitsubishi Lancer being praised for its practicality spaciousness and superb value and the Honda Insight deemed a good choice for those who need more space than you find in a small hatchback, but who still want a town-friendly, smooth and fuel-efficient car.

80% of the top ten most reliable cars were Japanese models and Honda did particularly well with 4 of its models making the top ten. The only non-Japanese cars to enter the top ten were the Mercedes-Benz CLC which came in at position number three and the Hyundai i30 which came in at position number seven.

The reliability of Japanese vehicles is believed to stem from Japan’s superior production processes and more meticulous testing regimes. Japanese brands also tend to be more conservative when it comes to adopting complex new technologies – though hybrid technology is an obvious exception to this trend.

The least reliable family car is the Skoda Superb, due in part to the large number of reported issues occurring in its engine (30%) and repair time averaging at around 3 hours. Costs of repairs were also particularly high averaging around £578. Results such as this are an example of how typically reliable cars can be pulled down in the rankings by unreliable parts.

Speaking about the latest results Philip Ward, COO of Warranty Direct commented:

 “Families demand a lot from their cars and need vehicles that won’t let them down. Mitsubishi’s success in the reliability rankings is chiefly down to low failure rates and when things go wrong, they are cheaper to fix. It’s imperative for buyers to consider reliability when purchasing a used family car. Manufacturers demonstrating their cars are durable and cheaper to maintain will continue to be the most popular choices amongst buyers.”

A more extensive list of vehicle information is available on the Reliability Index website.

Dec 272015
 

 

 

 

 

 

The UK used car market continues to grow, with recent DVLA statistics showing that used car transactions have grown by three per cent year on year during late summer/autumn 2015. Year to date used car transactions have also increased, by 4.2% and 225,000 units year-on-year according to Autotrader.co.uk.

The 4×4 segment showed the strongest performance with used sales of large and small 4x4s growing by 9.1% year on year as the UK moved towards winter, and savvy shoppers prepare for weather warnings. So right now, and not surprisingly, it costs more to buy a 4 x 4.

Auto Trader, the UK’s largest digital automotive marketplace for buying and selling new and used vehicles, have revealed the Top 10 most searched for 4x4s.

  • BMW X5
  • Land Rover Range Rover
  • Land Rover Range Rover Sport
  • BMW X3
  • Mercedes-Benz M-Class
  • Honda CR-V
  • VW Touareg
  • Land Rover Range Rover Evoque
  • Toyota RAV4
  • Audi Q5

Auto Trader’s Retailer and Consumer Products Director Karolina Edwards-Smajda, said; “The current increasing levels of used car transactions are a bi-product of the strong new car registrations that have been experienced over the last few years, with these vehicles now re-entering the used car market. Transactions for nearly new cars less than one year old and cars between one and three years old are fueling the growth, showing an increase of 8% and 15% year-on-year respectively.

Oct 072015
 

Aiming to inform all the Reliability Index , made possible by Warranty Direct, helps car owners find out how reliable their vehicle will be in the years to come after the manufacturer’s warranty expires.

Taking factors into account include breakdowns, age, mileage and car efficiency, the results help inform motorists what to possibly expect with their cars.

This week’s car: Toyota Avensis (2003-2007)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reliabilty Index Score: Average

After the first-generation Avensis, the second take on the model was a revelation. Okay, so Toyota still didn’t understand the concept of driving for fun or creative design, but when it comes to a painless ownership experience, there isn’t much that can compete with this family car. Offered in saloon, hatch or estate variants, the Avensis doesn’t excite you, but it is an easy car to own.

Written by Richard Dredge

What’s great about this car?

Reliability / Safety / Comfort / Equipment levels / Diesel engines

What’s not so great?

Unadventurous design / Dull dynamics

Things to keep an eye on

  • Engines can cut out for no apparent reason, usually because of a faulty fuel safety cut-out switch.
  • Diesel engines can also cut out because of a build up of residue on the hot wire in the air flow mass sensor.
  • Look for damaged rear suspension; speed bumps can wreak havoc with the car’s underside.
  • The petrol engines can use a litre of oil every 600 miles. So check the engine isn’t running on empty.
  • Make sure the headlight bulb surrounds are intact; they can melt, ensuring bulbs can’t be replaced. Damaged units should have been replaced under warranty.
  • Clutches aren’t always very durable, so check there’s no slipping.

For more in-depth details of this car, visit the page at the Reliability Index.

Sep 302015
 

Aiming to inform all the Reliability Index, made possible by Warranty Direct, helps car owners find out how reliable their vehicle will be in the years to come after their car falls out of the standard manufacturer’s warranty.

Taking factors into account include breakdowns, age, mileage and car efficiency, the results help inform motorists what to possibly expect with their cars.

This week’s car:  Toyota Corolla (2001-2006)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reliabilty Index Score:  Good

It’s the car that had a charisma bypass while it was on the drawing board, but with one of the highest levels of reliability around, you could be forgiven for overlooking the Corolla’s unexciting design. After more than three decades the Corolla is an icon – just a rather less exciting one than the 911. Don’t let that put you off though – if economy and reliability are your key requirements, you won’t go far wrong with a Corolla. It’s also better to drive than you might think – but it’s no Focus.

Written by Richard Dredge

What’s great about this car?

Reliability / Practicality / Affordability

What’s not so great?

Dull design inside and out / Smaller engines struggle

Things to keep an eye on

  • Electrical faults aren’t common, but have been known – so check everything works as it should.
  • Petrol engines can use oil at an alarming rate once they’ve covered 40,000 miles – as much as a litre every 600 miles.
  • If you’re buying a Verso, check its luggage cover is intact. It’s fiddly and can get broken through ham-fisted use.
  • Brake pedal sinks to the floor on 1.4 D-4D cars with the MMT gearbox, if engine is running but car is stationary.
  • Faulty fuel cut-off switch leads to car cutting out intermittently; diagnostics won’t show this though.

For more in-depth details of this car, visit the page at the Reliability Index.