Dec 012014
 

The Honda HR-V is the SUV most likely to keep you on the road during the approaching winter period, according to a new study by Warranty Direct.

SUVs and 4x4s now claim 11% of the market – up from 4.5 per cent in 2000* – as motorists are attracted by better ground clearance and a more commanding driving position. However, they do not always live up to their reputation for ruggedness.

Warranty Direct analysed its 50,000 live policies, using the Company’s unique Reliability Index (www.reliabilityindex.com) to measure overall reliability by combining rate of failure, average mileage, age and repair cost.

Honda’s HR-V (99-06) performed significantly better than other SUVs, with only one in 10 recording a fault in the last 12 months. The Suzuki Jimny was second most reliable in the sector, with one in five suffering a breakdown each year.

While the average SUV repair bill is £420, Warranty Direct reports that costs can soar as high as £16,000.

Top 10 Rated 4×4/SUVs
(A lower Reliability Index rating means the vehicle is more reliable and less expensive to run)

TopRated4x4

The 10 best performing SUVs are dominated by Japanese and Korean manufacturers, although Swedish manufacturer Volvo is cheapest to fix, with the lowest ‘largest claim’ cost of the top 10.

At the other end of the scale, the Mercedes-Benz GL is the least reliable of the off-roaders, with eight in 10 breaking down each year. The Audi Q7 and Audi A6 Allroad are not far behind in a list populated mostly by European manufacturers.

Bottom 5 rated 4×4/SUVs
(A higher Reliability Index rating means the vehicle is less reliable and more expensive to run)

BottomRated4x4

Warranty Direct managing director, David Gerrans, said: “The SUV market segment has developed significantly in recent years. In comparison to some other vehicles, they are fairly expensive to run but our study shows that there are reliable SUVs available which are not too costly.

“An SUV vehicle is most definitely the transport of choice for motorists during winter; not only is the driving position more commanding, but they are more likely to withstand challenging conditions.”

Warranty Direct cover starts from as little as £15 a month. For more information on the reliability of your vehicle, visit www.reliabilityindex.com, or for a quote on cover www.warrantydirect.co.uk.

Jan 072010
 

Honda’s CR-VWith the world’s greatest off-road race, the Dakar Rally, getting underway last Friday (Jan 1), Warranty Direct has revealed the most – and least – reliable pre-owned 4×4 and SUV cars on the market.

Audi’s A6 Allroad fared worst, with more than half recording a fault in a typical year. A third of those problems reported were suspension-related.

At the other end of the scale, Honda’s CR-V was revealed as the off-roader least likely to let you down, followed by the Suzuki Grand Vitara and Toyota’s RAV4. Mitsubishi and Kia make it a clean sweep for Far Eastern manufacturers in the top five.

The Volkswagen Touareg, despite winning the 2009 running of the famously tough Dakar at the hands of South African Giniel de Villiers, didn’t transfer its success to Warranty Direct’s study, finishing fourth from bottom with a quarter of faults down to electrical gremlins.

Warranty Direct’s study used its unique Reliability Index (www.reliabilityindex.co.uk), which takes into account how often vehicles break down, average repair cost and time spent in the garage to calculate its overall reliability. The lower the Reliability Index number, the more reliable the car.

Top 10 4×4/SUVs

 

 

Manufacturer

Model

Average   Repair Cost

Reliability   Index Rating

1

Honda

CR-V  (01-06)

£239.63

23.10

2

Suzuki

Grand   Vitara  (98-05)

£219.43

33.01

3

Toyota

RAV4  (00-06)

£330.58

42.69

4

Mitsubishi

Shogun   (00-07)

£595.58

47.53

5

Kia

Sorento  (03-)

£332.34

59.36

6

Nissan

Terrano   II (93-06)

£277.25

62.81

7

Land   Rover

Freelander  (03-06)

£370.23

66.11

8

Lexus

RX300  (03-09)

£571.60

68.69

9

Nissan

X-Trail  (01-)

£433.18

73.69

10

Toyota

Landcruiser   (03-)

£525.01

82.78

 

The highest-placed European car is the newer incarnation of perennial 4×4 favourite, Land Rover’s Freelander, which has traditionally fared badly in Warranty Direct’s studies.

Warranty Direct’s Duncan McClure Fisher said: “It’s promising to see improvement from Land Rover’s flagship model, but it’s telling that the bottom 10 is dominated by European cars, and the top of the list populated largely by Japanese vehicles, which still hold sway overall. The biggest surprise must surely be the poor performance of the XC90. It’s not what you’d expect from a manufacturer with Volvo’s reputation, but I’m signing cheques every day on XC90 repairs.”

With an average repair cost of £595.58, the Mitsubishi Shogun (00-07) is the most expensive to fix but thankfully has a low incidence rate, with just under 8% per year suffering a glitch.

Meanwhile, a third of Nissan’s X-Trail problems are down to cooling and heating issues while almost 60% of enforced garage visits for Volvo XC-70 owners are due to suspension breakages.

Bottom 10 4×4/SUVs

 

Manufacturer

Model

Average   Repair Cost

Reliability   Index Rating

1

Audi

A6   Allroad  (00-05)

£516.03

281.60

2

Volkswagen

Touareg  (03-)

£567.92

194.01

3

BMW

X5  (00-)

£517.30

193.36

4

Jeep

Cherokee  (01-08)

£522.40

155.72

5

Volvo

XC90  (02-)

£522.83

153.88

6

Land   Rover

Range   Rover  (02-)

£493.59

140.96

7

Land   Rover

Discovery   (98-04)

£332.17

120.11

8

Mercedes

M-Class   (98-05)

£393.01

119.85

9

Land   Rover

Discovery   (04-)

£405.10

119.44

10

Volvo

XC70   (00-07)

£429.53

115.21

 

The analysis is based on Warranty Direct’s database of 150,000 policies on cars between three and eight years old.

Jan 232007
 

Jeep 4x4'sOff-road specialist, Jeep, has come bottom in arguably the world’s largest ever study into car reliability, just ahead of another 4×4-maker, Land Rover.

Almost one in every two (46 percent) of the American 4×4 giant’s models recorded a mechanical failure during a given twelve-month period. That figure was nearly six times worse than Mazda, which topped the table with a frequency of failure of just 8.04 percent.

The study by independent automotive warranty specialist, Warranty Direct, looked at more than 450,000 vehicles, across 33 manufacturers, from the UK and the USA.

Only two non-Far East manufacturers made it into the top ten – the BMW-owned, but Oxfordshire-built, MINI, and French player, Citroen, scoring ninth and tenth places respectively.

The unique Warranty Direct reliability league table was based on the number of failures reported for every 100 policies sold to owners of vehicles aged 3-9 years old. Vehicles analysed were available in both UK and US markets.

Korean manufacturer, Kia, proved that budget does not necessarily mean corner cutting when it comes to reliability. The rising star of world motoring was fifth in the table with an incidence rate of 17.4 percent.

BMW (18th) was placed at the head of Germany’s ‘Big Three’ of Mercedes (20th) and Audi, which was languishing in 27th spot.

“The performance of some of the worlds largest manufacturers in terms of reliability is there for all to see,” said Duncan McClure Fisher, managing director, Warranty Direct. “Off-road may mean rugged, but the data suggests that it may not always stand for reliability if you consider the specialists.”

“This is unique data based on real cars, driving real miles. It is the kind of information manufacturers would probably rather you didn’t see.”

The reliability of the UK’s top five selling makes does not necessarily reflect their status amongst the car buying populace. The nation’s number one choice, Ford, was 14th, followed by Vauxhall in 19th, Volkswagen in 23rd, Renault in 29th and Peugeot the best of the bunch in 13th.

For further information visit www.reliabilityindex.co.uk