Apr 272016

Used cars that have covered ‘starship mileages’ of 150,000 or more are no longer off-putting to buyers if the condition and the badge is right, reports car price guide specialist Glass’s Guide. They also believe that a healthy market has developed for prestige cars that would once have been considered almost unsaleable.

Rupert Pontin, head of valuations, said: “A high-level Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Audi or Jaguar that has covered 100,000-150,000 miles at five to eight years old is probably worth at least 10% less than identical models that have only done an average of 10,000 miles per year.

“However, if it has been properly maintained, the starship car probably looks every bit as good and, thanks to good build quality, is probably not much less reliable or much more expensive to run.

“It’s a cost effective way of getting behind the wheel of a nice car that will impress the neighbours.

“Buyers are waking up to the fact that these vehicles represent something of a bargain and we are seeing an increase in demand. There are also a number of specialist dealers that specifically supply this sector.”

Pontin said the market was catching on to the fact that modern cars were capable of much higher mileages than even just a few years ago.

“Even at the turn of the century, 100,000 miles meant that a car was nearing the end of its useful life. Nowadays, cars at that mileage are just getting into their stride. If properly maintained, most modern models are capable of 250,000 miles and even more.

“This is true of nearly all cars but the advantage that higher level, prestige models have is that the quality of their finish is higher than the mass market.

“This is especially true of interiors. A well-cared-for high mileage Audi A6 or A8 will still be a very nice place in which to sit, for example, with little obvious wear.

“If you make the basic checks on condition and ensure that they have a comprehensive service history, these vehicles can make an excellent buy. They are potentially no more than half way through their lives.”

Pontin added that what tended to eventually kill older cars of this type was not the fact that they were no longer viable vehicles but that the repairs needed to keep them on the road were no longer economically sustainable.

“Big prestige cars like Mercedes S-Class and BMW 7 Series can keep going almost forever if properly maintained,” he said.

“However, they reach a point after a decade or so where they are worth just a couple of thousand or few hundred pounds and something breaks that is small but essential and expensive to repair.”


Sep 072015

It’s the beginning of another week here at Warranty Direct and we thought we’d share a roundup of the popular news articles we’ve recently shared through our social media feeds:

Autocar – The Auction Bible








Autocar recently looked into how the value of used cars is decided with the Glass’s price guide and forecasting tools, the oldest and best known of the UK’s guides.  The article by Steve Cropley features an interview with Rupert Pontin, the new head of valuations at Glass’s Guide.

Over-Declaring Penalty Points Lets Insurers Overcharge








The Telegraph reported recently that customers needlessly telling insurance firms about expired penalty points on their driving licenses add £57 to premiums – yet insurers continue to ask about old convictions.

Appeal Your Parking Fines In Seconds – Auto Express








An 18-year old has created a new website to help motorists appeal against unfair parking fines. The free service allows fined drivers to create customized appeal letters within a minute to sending to the relevant council involved.

You can follow our Facebook and Twitter feeds (including ones for Reliability Index and Potholes UK) to see more motoring related articles such as these offerings every day.

Have a good week!


Sep 242014

Cost of ClockingThe simple fact is that adjusting the mileage of a used car, often referred to as ‘clocking’, costs the buyer dearly. So the car data checking company HPI joins forces with valuations experts, Glass’s, to reveal just how much money dodgy sellers can con out of buyers.

“Too many used car buyers ignore the threat or just aren’t aware of the risks from fraudsters who use ‘clocking’ to alter a vehicle’s mileage,” says www.hpicheck.com Senior Consumer Services Manager, Shane Teskey. “We’re hoping that by exposing how much money buyers stand to lose, consumers will take greater steps to protect themselves. It’s almost impossible to spot a clocked vehicle just by looking at it, which makes an HPI Check a vital tool for buyers keen to avoid falling foul of fraudsters.”

Andrew Jackson, Head of Analytics at Glass’s, comments, “Clocking is a serious issue – dodgy sellers are making a fast profit at the expense of innocent buyers, but consumers could lose more than just money if they buy a vehicle they don’t realise has been clocked. Tampering with the odometer may lead to safety issues, especially if a vehicle appears as if it doesn’t need a service, when it actually does. The act of clocking could disguise the need for a major mechanical repair, leaving buyers with a hefty bill if something does go wrong.”

Shane Teskey concludes, “We’re working closely with Glass’s to help raise consumer awareness of the threat of clocking. This is a widespread issue, but the HPI Check comes with a mileage check as standard, offering vital peace of mind and protection from clockers.”

The HPI Check includes a mileage check against the National Mileage Register as standard, now with over 170 million mileage readings. HPI also confirms whether a vehicle is currently recorded by the police as stolen, has outstanding finance against it or has been written-off, making it the best way for consumers to protect themselves from fraudsters looking to make a fast profit. In addition, the HPI Check offers a Guarantee of up to £30,000 in the event of the information it provides being inaccurate or incomplete, offering added financial peace of mind to used car buyers.

Reg_date Make Model Colour Mileage Glass’s Valuation £ difference % difference
11/02/2011 VW Golf BLUE 45,000  £11,060 £2,190 25%
11/02/2011 VW Golf BLUE 90,000  £8,870
01/02/2011 BMW 5 Series GREY 70,000  £15,960 £2,580 19%
01/02/2011 BMW 5 Series GREY 120,000  £13,380
06/05/2011 Vauxhall Insignia BLACK 45,000  £10,320 £1,950 23%
06/05/2011 Vauxhall Insignia BLACK 90,000  £8,370
31/08/2011 Mercedes C-Class BLACK 45,000  £18,600 £2,240 14%
31/08/2011 Mercedes C-Class BLACK 90,000  £16,360