Oct 132016
 

The latest results from Warranty Direct reveal the Mitsubishi Lancer is the most reliable family car according to the latest data from their Reliability Index website.

The Reliability Index analyses all the vehicle data on live Warranty Direct and collates it into creating a reliability rating. The lower the rating, the better the reliability. As well as finding out the overall reliability of a car, the index offers information on which car parts fail most often  such as air conditioning, axle & suspension, braking, cooling, electrical components, engines and fuel.

Family cars are usually chosen for being specifically good at daily domestic work, which means considering a certain set of parameters rather than just an outright type of model. Many couples are more likely to choose a vehicle based on its ability to meet family needs. Practicality, running costs and price all score high on the hit list, though some want style and something fun to drive, too.

Top ten most reliable family cars

Position Model Sector
1 Mitsubishi Lancer Small Family
2 Honda Insight Small Family
3 Mercedes-Benz CLC Small Family
4 Honda Accord (08-) Family Car
5 Honda Civic (00-06) Small Family
6 Toyota Prius (03-09) Family Car
7 Hyundai i30 Small Family
8 Nissan Almera Small Family
9 Honda Civic (06-) Small Family
10 Toyota Prius (09-) Family Car

The Mitsubishi Lancer, is the most reliable family car with the time spent off the road for repairs typically less than an hour and the average repair cost only £69. The Honda Insight came in at second place, but due to a high number of reported issues occurring with its axle suspension, the costs of repairs are over double that of Mitsubishi’s averaging at around £137. This lowered its position in the rankings.

Both cars received good family car reviews with the Mitsubishi Lancer being praised for its practicality spaciousness and superb value and the Honda Insight deemed a good choice for those who need more space than you find in a small hatchback, but who still want a town-friendly, smooth and fuel-efficient car.

80% of the top ten most reliable cars were Japanese models and Honda did particularly well with 4 of its models making the top ten. The only non-Japanese cars to enter the top ten were the Mercedes-Benz CLC which came in at position number three and the Hyundai i30 which came in at position number seven.

The reliability of Japanese vehicles is believed to stem from Japan’s superior production processes and more meticulous testing regimes. Japanese brands also tend to be more conservative when it comes to adopting complex new technologies – though hybrid technology is an obvious exception to this trend.

The least reliable family car is the Skoda Superb, due in part to the large number of reported issues occurring in its engine (30%) and repair time averaging at around 3 hours. Costs of repairs were also particularly high averaging around £578. Results such as this are an example of how typically reliable cars can be pulled down in the rankings by unreliable parts.

Speaking about the latest results Philip Ward, COO of Warranty Direct commented:

 “Families demand a lot from their cars and need vehicles that won’t let them down. Mitsubishi’s success in the reliability rankings is chiefly down to low failure rates and when things go wrong, they are cheaper to fix. It’s imperative for buyers to consider reliability when purchasing a used family car. Manufacturers demonstrating their cars are durable and cheaper to maintain will continue to be the most popular choices amongst buyers.”

A more extensive list of vehicle information is available on the Reliability Index website.

Nov 302015
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Need a small family car? It has to be either a posh VW Golf or a hardworking Ford Focus.

Why Buy?

No one ever made a mistake by choosing a VW Golf. Even now, after the diesel scandal, these are still regarded as well built, practical and reliable. The Ford Focus has a bit more of a twist, it is still practical and cost effective to run, but it is also fun to drive. Many buyers like that.

Which models?

 The 2004-2009 Golf is regarded as the period when the model returned to form. They have decent safety equipment and the SE is the best spec. The all-new Focus had a tough act to follow, but it is stylish, spacious and reliable. LX specification has air conditioning.

Are they reliable?

The Golf has proved to be very trustworthy, the trouble is that fixing the Golf is always more costly than the Ford, by some margin. Also, Warranty Direct makes it clear that overall the Focus has proved to be the more reliable buy. So for cost and overall reliability the Focus wins.

How much do they cost?

It is now possible to buy high mileage examples from 2004 to 2005 at below £2000. Late examples are now around £8000, usually the high spec sporty ones. The focus is often discounted and around in large numbers so prices start at just over £1000 rising to £7800 or so.

Sum Up: Golf means style and quality, but it will cost more to run. The Focus means low running costs and reliability, the sensible choice.

Volkswagen Golf

 Average Repair Cost: £306.97

Axle and Suspension: 19.41%*

Electrical: 16.47%*

Engine: 21.76%*

Warranty Direct Rating: Average

* Failure rate

Ford Focus

Average Repair Cost: £280.83

Electrical: 30.39*

Axle/Suspension: 15.31%*

Engine: 16.47*

Warranty Direct Rating: Above Average

* Failure rate

Oct 072015
 

Aiming to inform all the Reliability Index , made possible by Warranty Direct, helps car owners find out how reliable their vehicle will be in the years to come after the manufacturer’s warranty expires.

Taking factors into account include breakdowns, age, mileage and car efficiency, the results help inform motorists what to possibly expect with their cars.

This week’s car: Toyota Avensis (2003-2007)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reliabilty Index Score: Average

After the first-generation Avensis, the second take on the model was a revelation. Okay, so Toyota still didn’t understand the concept of driving for fun or creative design, but when it comes to a painless ownership experience, there isn’t much that can compete with this family car. Offered in saloon, hatch or estate variants, the Avensis doesn’t excite you, but it is an easy car to own.

Written by Richard Dredge

What’s great about this car?

Reliability / Safety / Comfort / Equipment levels / Diesel engines

What’s not so great?

Unadventurous design / Dull dynamics

Things to keep an eye on

  • Engines can cut out for no apparent reason, usually because of a faulty fuel safety cut-out switch.
  • Diesel engines can also cut out because of a build up of residue on the hot wire in the air flow mass sensor.
  • Look for damaged rear suspension; speed bumps can wreak havoc with the car’s underside.
  • The petrol engines can use a litre of oil every 600 miles. So check the engine isn’t running on empty.
  • Make sure the headlight bulb surrounds are intact; they can melt, ensuring bulbs can’t be replaced. Damaged units should have been replaced under warranty.
  • Clutches aren’t always very durable, so check there’s no slipping.

For more in-depth details of this car, visit the page at the Reliability Index.

Sep 252015
 

Skoda RoomsterVauxhall Meriva

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skoda Roomster vs Vauxhall Meriva

Small, practical and slightly funky cars are all the rage and perfect for equally funky families.

Why Buy?

We buy cars on looks and when we do that we end up with a Roomster. Cheaper to buy and run than the Yeti, with a less odd name but bags of space. The Meriva is good to drive and has groovy doors as the rear ones hinge the other way. Lots of space inside of course.

Which models?

The Skoda Roomster dates from 2005. There is a Scout model which made it look a lot more like an off roader, so its all for show and no 4 x 4 go. 2010 is when the Meriva became really interesting with those hand clap style doors. Also more refined and better to drive too.

Are they reliable?

On the whole both vehicles are pretty reliable and the Skoda seems to have faults spread around the fewest components. Both the Vauxhall and the Skoda suffer from the modern malady which is electrical issues. Both though rate above average according to Warranty Direct.

How much do they cost?

The Roomster can now be bought below £2000 and at the other end of the scale a two year old example is just over £12,000. You might get a 2010 Meriva with high mileage for £3300 rising to £13,500.

Sum Up: Both are great small family cars. The Roomster does not look it, but is the more conventional. Most of all both are interesting.

Skoda Roomster

Average Repair Cost: £333.75

Electrical: 45.45*

Axle/Suspension: 18.18%*

Gearbox: 13.64*

Warranty Direct Rating: Above Average to Good

* failure rate

Vauxhall Meriva

Average Repair Cost: £287.23

Electrical: 32.95%*

Steering System: 16.76%*

Transmission: 13.29*

Warranty Direct Rating: Above Average