Jan 022018
 

A checklist for when the unanticipated occurs

While there has been an 11 percent decrease in UK road accidents within the last five years, there were still 181,384 reported cases during 2016.

When it comes to car accidents many may think, ‘it will never happen to me’. Unfortunately, that might not be the case and things can happen outside even the most experienced of motorists’ control.

For help when you need it most, Warranty Direct has put together advice to make sure you’re prepared, whatever happens on the roads…

Be prepared

You never know when an accident might occur, so it’s important to be prepared. Have your insurance information, vehicle registration and license available at all times while on the road.

In case emergency situations occur in the dark or with bad visibility, it’s a good idea to have a torch, reflective triangle and high visibility jacket in your car to ensure other motorists can see you.

Safety First

Even if you think it’s not serious and you’ve only caused a couple of scuffs or scratches, you must stop after an accident. Failing to do so is a punishable offence by the Road Traffic Act.

If your car is driveable, find a safe place to pull over, switch off your engine and turn your hazard lights on to alert other road users.

If anyone has been hurt, contact an ambulance as soon as possible. Unless their injuries prevent it, remove passengers from the vehicle to a safe place. If the road is blocked, you should call the police.

You and your passengers should stand behind the motorway crash barrier, wearing reflective jackets, so you are visible to other drivers and wait for the emergency services to arrive.

According to the Highway Code, you must leave any animals in the vehicle or, in an emergency, keep them under control on the verge.

Collect all the necessary details

When you’re involved in a car accident you’re obligated to give your name and address to anyone else involved. You should also collect contact details from any drivers, passengers and witnesses.

Ask any drivers involved for their insurance details and establish whether they own the vehicle. If they don’t, find out who does and note their details.

If damage has been caused to third party property or a parked car you should leave a note with your contact details on a car’s windscreen if you’re unable to find the owner. If you don’t exchange details at the scene, you must report the incident to the police within 24 hours.

You’ll also need to make note of other details, which will help when it comes to sorting out the incident with insurers.

These include:

  • Time and date of the crash
  • Registration, colour, make and model of all vehicles involved
  • Photos for evidence – most mobiles will take good enough pictures to help you recall significant details.

Dealing with your insurer

It’s important to try to stay neutral and not accept liability or apologise if you’re unsure of who or what has caused the accident. Of course, this can be difficult in a stressful situation when emotions are heightened, but believe it or not, even saying something as small as ‘sorry’, could work against you later on when claiming for insurance.

While you are not obligated to claim after an accident, you should report the accident to your insurer within the time stated in your policy. Otherwise, your insurer has the right to refuse to cover you in future.

If you have GAP insurance, it’s worth noting some providers will ask you to call them before accepting any offer by your regular insurer. Make sure you inform the insurance provider of the accident to ensure the correct pay-out from the motor insurer.

Apr 262016
 

potholesA new study of 3-8 year old cars from Warranty Direct reveals the Mercedes Benz R-Class (06-15) and Saab 9-3 (04-12) are the cars most likely to suffer suspension damage. Hyundai’s Santa Fe (06-12) and the Land Rover Discovery 3 (04-10) have the next most susceptible suspension, with 13.9 and 13.3 percent respectively of Warranty Direct customers claiming for axle & suspension damage annually.

Potholes are typically at their most prevalent on Britain’s underinvested road network between January and April, as heavy rainfall undermines the lower structural layers of roads, creating cracks then more potholes, increasing the likelihood of suspension damage.

The recent Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance (ALARM) survey revealed that local authorities spent a total of £118.4m filling 2,190,026 potholes across England and Wales in the last year, but also paid out an additional £13.5m in compensation claims.

With the average repair bill for pothole damage now £350, Warranty Direct’s database of 50,000 live policies shows that the most vulnerable cars are more than 15 times worse than the most robust models.

At the opposite end of the scale, the Ford S-Max (06-15) and Nissan Qashqai (07-14) share top billing as the cars least likely to be affected by the UK’s pothole-ridden roads; both boast an impressive clean sheet when it comes to model claims relating to axle & suspension damage.

Top 10 cars with the highest % chance of an annual axle & suspension related claim

Number

Make Model Group Year % chance of an axle & suspension related claim annually

1

MERCEDES-BENZ R-Class (06-15) 15.82%

2

SAAB 9-3 (04-12)

15.05%

3

HYUNDAI SANTA FE (06-12) 13.98%

4

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY 3 (04-10)

13.37%

5 MERCEDES-BENZ GL-Class (06-15)

12.61%

6 VAUXHALL ASTRA (04-12)

11.56%

7 LANDROVER RANGE ROVER (02-13)

11.28%

8 BMW X5 (07-13)

11.27%

9 MERCEDES-BENZ E-Class (06-09)

11.17%

10 MERCEDES-BENZ CLS-Class (05-10)

11.15%

 

Warranty Direct managing director, David Gerrans, said: “The variation you see in suspension damage from one model to another is remarkable.”

“Potholes are a major factor in causing axle & suspension failure and any vehicle regularly driven over impaired road surfaces or used for commuting over pothole-strewn routes will ultimately incur damage eventually.

“Components such as bushes, track rod ends, drop links, springs and dampers are all susceptible. Visit our Potholes.co.uk site for detailed advice on how best to make a compensation claim for any vehicle damaged by potholes.”

Aug 182005
 

3rd world countryPoor road surfaces continue to account for nearly 1 in 6*1 vehicle failures as the shortfall in annual road maintenance funding hits the £1bn mark*2.

According to a study by independent automotive warranty firm, Warranty Direct, 17.1 percent of reported car failures for the first eight months of 2005 are the result of suspension and axle damage, linked to potholes. The average cost of repair, so far, stands at £276.07 – compared to £185.84 in 2000.

Warranty Direct has recorded a 42 percent increase in the number of claims it handles where the vehicle owner subsequently refers the cost to local authorities for compensation over the past 12 months.

The most recent survey by ALARM (Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance)*2 revealed increases in claims by road users against local authorities for damage to vehicles due to road structural conditions over the past 10 years of 60 percent in England (exc London), a staggering 187% in Wales and 43% in London. It also revealed a near £1bn shortfall in road maintenance funding for 2004, an increase of almost 50 percent.

Either continuous driving over cracked or uneven road surfaces, or the sudden jolting of a deep pothole, can cause damage to shock absorbers, springs, upper and lower arms and stabiliser bars.

Regionally, Anglia recorded the largest share of all claims attributable to a road defect for one region. At 28.35 percent, it was up by more than half compared to 2004. More than 1 in 5 claims from motorists in the North East and Scotland were the result of poor road conditions.

Greater London crept above the national average to 17.74 percent of failures compared to 13.99 percent in 2004. The rise left the local authority with a £392,000 compensation bill.

Table showing percentage of all suspension and axle failures:

Pos   Region                  Percentage

1.      Anglia                           28.35

2.      Scotland                       21.43

3.      North East                    21.07

4.      Greater London           17.74

5.      East Midlands              16.52

6.      North West                  14.78

7.      South East                  13.60

8.      Wales                          12.56

9.      South West                 12.50

10.     West Midlands           12.47

 

Warranty Direct managing director Duncan McClure Fisher commented: “It is fast becoming a Catch 22 for the local authorities. Under funding, poor and potentially dangerous road surfaces, and a diversion of much needed finances to deal with the marked increase in compensation claims.

“Last year, our research highlighted the link between poor road conditions and a 47 percent rise in suspension failures over a five year period. Twelve months on, the problem remains and there are no signs that matters will improve in the short-term,” McClure Fisher added.

In 2004, local authorities in England paid out more than £810,000*2 in compensation. Records for Wales show a similar sum of £790,000*2.

Vehicle reliability data is available on www.reliabilityindex.co.uk

Based on data gathered from millions of pounds worth of claims handled every year by leading independent automotive warranty supplier, Warranty Direct, the Reliability Index provides the car buyer with a valuable insight into the good, bad and ugly of the motoring community.

Visitors to the website are able to examine a host of data including the average cost of repair and length of time it should spend in the garage.

Importantly it also plots the chances of your chosen model suffering from engine meltdown, transmission hiccups, air-conditioning failure and axle or suspension trouble.